Glued

A short film about a mother trying to deal with her video game addicted son.
Author:- ddeubel


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A short film about a mother trying to deal with her video game addicted son.

Alphagames

Can your students guess all the games mentioned/shown in this superb video remix? Answers below...
Author:- ddeubel


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Can your students guess all the games mentioned/shown in this superb video remix? Answers below...

Alphagames - Shapes of the Latin Alphabets in Popular Games

"The Alphabet in Video Games: Animations that quiz your video game knowledge. How many titles can you name?" This might be another good alphabet motivation resource to add to your…
Author:- Thaddeus McCleary


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"The Alphabet in Video Games:
Animations that quiz your video game knowledge. How many titles can you name?"

This might be another good alphabet motivation resource to add to your collection.

Montage Maker

A tutorial showing teachers how to use this very simple but powerful contextualizing tool. http://grant.robinson.name/montage-maker/. Example resources and post…
Author:- ddeubel


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A tutorial showing teachers how to use this very simple but powerful contextualizing tool. http://grant.robinson.name/montage-maker/. Example resources and post HERE.

Hunger Games

Everyone is talking about this... so your students might be interested. Here are some ideas from the NY Times Lesson Plan…
Author:- ddeubel


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Everyone is talking about this... so your students might be interested. Here are some ideas from the NY Times Lesson Plan section.

‘the Kitchen’ game cards

The Kitchen is a theatre play performed by UKLA Children…
Author:- ridvan saglam

the kitchen game cards

DOWNLOAD

The Kitchen is a theatre play performed by UKLA Children & Youth Theatre in Turkey. The main target of this project is to increase motivation of learning English and present alternative ways for practice.

These game cards are another part of the project. They were prepared by UKLA Creative Team.

See sample cards

Feel free to use and share.

Games in the English language classroom

Games are wonderful to use in our classrooms, a must.   See below, many of the well researched reasons we should be using them in our teaching. Nowadays, with online resources and resource sharing, there is no longer any excuse for not using games. So many ways and so many options.  Here are a few…
Author:- ddeubel

Games are wonderful to use in our classrooms, a must.  

See below, many of the well researched reasons we should be using them in our teaching.

Nowadays, with online resources and resource sharing, there is no longer any excuse for not using games. So many ways and so many options. 

Here are a few of the games related resources and pages you'll find here on EFL Classroom 2.0. [also just click the PLAY tab at the top of each page]

 

1.  Our Games Page.

2.  Our Language Game Arcade

3.  PPTs and resources

4.  Top 5 games series

5.  What The Wordle

6. Diigo flashcards (each set can be played by students)

7. Videos labelled games.   Posts labelled "games".

8. Why do we need games - discussion.

9. 100 games for children

10.  Blog posts

 

Top 5 favorite online language games

Now and then, I post on my twitter @ddeubel , some "tired teacher tips". Things that a teacher can just put up on a screen with a click and get students learning/producing English. I'll post another time about these (the hashtag is #tttips) but I want…
Author:- ddeubel

gaming-abcsNow and then, I post on my twitter @ddeubel , some "tired teacher tips". Things that a teacher can just put up on a screen with a click and get students learning/producing English.

I'll post another time about these (the hashtag is #tttips) but I want to share something similar. My 5 top online games for students. These can also be used by "tired" teachers however the point or hope is that students will find these so engaging that they'll want to keep playing at home. So I'm not going to list "learning" games like quizzes, matching etc... (I'll do that another time). Just games that are truly beyond the classroom and "learning English".

So here it goes .....

#1 Draw My Thing. Hours of "live" fun where you play pictionary online. It is full of contextualized language as competitors try to come up with the right answer. Don't expect many second language learners to win but I can guarantee they'll get addicted (and their English will improve).

#2 Montage a Google. An oldie but still a goldie. Grant's game is a real classic and it also focuses on great contextual learning with photos. Students must guess the google search term for a series of 16 photos. Absorbing and great for vocabulary practice.

#3 Key Mamba. This is a new one (and what sparked this post). It is super for practicing root words / compound words. It almost borders into a "learning" game but I think doesn't cross the line of being academic oriented. You get 10 word parts and must guess the common word before the timer runs down. Really good for academic English students.

#4 The Tipping Point. I'm not a huge fan of point and click games for language learning (many teachers are). However, this one has handy walkthroughs for the student to reference so they can actually go back and repeat the steps. Plus, the graphics/sounds can't be beat!

#5 The Subservient Chicken. Okay, it's Burger King and it's only a chicken. However, there isn't any more fun or great language prompting than making the chicken do what you want. Absorbing....

Honorable mentions: Akinator / Alice the chatterbot , Deal or No Deal

I've made it a kind of obsessive quest to catalog games on EFL Classroom. Use our GAMES page for a start. But also, the ARCADE and the GOAL GAMES.  Others there too, just browse around.

Top 5 traditional online games

Today I offer my Top 5 that are more "traditional". By that I mean they are more controlled and less authentic. Quizzes, Q and A trivia, mix and match, multiple choice - you get the idea. Still, if done well, they can be really effective learning tools or even assessment tools. They are meant to be used by students at home or in a language lab but can also be used in a classroom with a large…
Author:- ddeubel

quizToday I offer my Top 5 that are more "traditional".

By that I mean they are more controlled and less authentic. Quizzes, Q and A trivia, mix and match, multiple choice - you get the idea. Still, if done well, they can be really effective learning tools or even assessment tools. They are meant to be used by students at home or in a language lab but can also be used in a classroom with a large monitor/screen. (and you'll see a lot of great apps like these games - coming to mobile technology! A few have started and I'll review shortly. )

Forthcoming - The Top 5 TV style games for language learning.

So here it goes.....

#1 Memory Games.  Here's an example.  Very traditional "concentration" type game. Find many more on all topics on our full Games page (look for "Memory" in the title..

#2 Spelling Bee. This is for L1 learners but works also for second language learners. A listening cloze and then students must put in the correct word. Multiple levels. Great audio

#3 Free Rice . Vocabulary quizzes that adapt content to how well you do. Get answers right, get higher leveled words. Get answers wrong, get tested with lower level words. Plus - donate food to the needy with every correct answer!

#4 ELLLO games. Excellent listening material with photos. A lot of their stuff is a little hard to navigate and dense but the games listening quizzes are wonderful works of art. Great for students.

#5 Spiderman. I had to include this here! It is addictive and along with a smiliar Letter Rip just take learning to a new level of "game".

Honorable Mentions: Tutpup. EnglishCentral Learn. Quizlet Flashcard games. (click a set and then click the games underneath the main window.

I've made it a kind of obsessive quest to catalog games on EFL Classroom. Use our GAMES page for a start. But also, the ARCADE and the GOAL GAMES.  Others there too - try our Learning Lab!

A Smart Dog; a cartoon story

A smart dog is a cartoon story which was prepared  as a warm up activity by Ridvan B. Saglam. You can download JPEG file here. Also you can download flash story from the link below. It can be used as a warm-up activity for…
Author:- ridvan saglam

A smart dog is a cartoon story which was prepared  as a warm up activity by Ridvan B. Saglam. You can download JPEG file here. Also you can download flash story from the link below. It can be used as a warm-up activity for Simple Past, Past Cont., Present Perfect, or just for fun. In flash file, you can read the comic strips one by one, take a short quiz about the story and you can try to tell the story again by using pictures. Hope you enjoy it.

Featured Resource: Quiz and Trivia Questions

I was a big trivia buff when growing up. Captain of our high school "Reach for the Top" team and proud of it. Avid Jeopardy watcher. All part of being curious about the world I guess. And I think most students are too and it is great to learn "something" while learning language.  We have some…
Author:- ddeubel

I was a big trivia buff when growing up. Captain of our high school "Reach for the Top" team and proud of it. Avid Jeopardy watcher. All part of being curious about the world I guess. And I think most students are too and it is great to learn "something" while learning language. 

We have some great trivia questions for making games. Of course, tons of Jeopardy games too. Students can use the questions to challenge each other and it would even make a great digital lesson. Students use their own devices to find the answer first! Google does have all the answers, doesn't it?  Here's my fav. Raul Midon song - get the teachable version here...

 

Taboo Cards for Occupations

  DOWNLOAD: …
Author:- ridvan saglam

 

DOWNLOAD: 

taboo job cards.zip and taboo card template.doc

Montage Maker

Today I was experimenting with a cool way to support your classroom instruction and contextualize the language you are teaching. Even make a game of it! I returned to Grant Robinson, maker of the wonderful Guess The Google game. It's since been retired but now he has adapted it into Montage Maker. The idea is fairly simple - type…
Author:- ddeubel

Today I was experimenting with a cool way to support your classroom instruction and contextualize the language you are teaching. Even make a game of it!

I returned to Grant Robinson, maker of the wonderful Guess The Google game. It's since been retired but now he has adapted it into Montage Maker.

The idea is fairly simple - type in a word and it will pull up photos in a montage (40 of them). Great for showing students and explaining a word, talking about a topic. Put the topic in and you'll have a great backdrop!

Further, as I show in the screencast, you can download the montages and easily make games, ppts, flashcard sets. A very handy materials development tool! Here are two I made - I feel ..... and Where Are You? Get the ppts on EFL Classroom 2.0.

Here are a couple of similar tools:  Guess The Tag, Fastr.


Find more videos like this on EFL CLASSROOM 2.0

Flash games for A1 level

We have prepared 8 vocabulary flash games for Elementary level. They are funny and easy to play. Topics of the games are; Clothes, Basic…
Author:- ridvan saglam

We have prepared 8 vocabulary flash games for Elementary level. They are funny and easy to play.

Topics of the games are;

Clothes,

Basic adjectives,

Furnitures,

Jobs,

Rooms at home,

Places in the city.

Have fun.

My Best "Practical" Teaching posts

I'd like to share for the start of a new school year or semester - My best "Practical" blog posts. Meaning, posts about actual resources to be downloaded, used in class. Lesson ideas. This complements my …
Author:- ddeubel

I'd like to share for the start of a new school year or semester - My best "Practical" blog posts. Meaning, posts about actual resources to be downloaded, used in class. Lesson ideas. This complements my Best Teaching Advice posts.

 

Also invaluable - 

 

The #1 in ELT Series of posts and my ebook - The Unbearable Lightness of Being a Teacher. .  Supporters will also benefit from the"I"m a Newbie Teacher" group - a complete directory of great resources!

 

[in the coming days I'll share my best Teaching advice posts]

 

1. Classroom decorating ideas

2. Song Lyric Sheets

3. Teaching with a blank piece of paper

4. Authentic Materials

5. Going to Pieces

6. Making a Doodle Video

7. Using Flashcards

8. Drawing Resources

9. 2 Way Tasks

10. Blank Dialogue Videos

11. Making Storybooks

12.PPT Games Series

13. Poetry in the Classroom

14. Kinetic Typography videos

15. Using Silent Video and Using Video

Top 5 games for teaching social and global issues

The "Top" games series continues! Today, in celebration of the forthcoming Earth Day, the top 5 games that focus on global/world issues. Global Issues are something that students really get interested in. Very motivating for language learning and it brings the learning focus into the wider world and gets kids thinking, critically…
Author:- ddeubel

global-social-issuesThe "Top" games series continues! Today, in celebration of the forthcoming Earth Day, the top 5 games that focus on global/world issues.

Global Issues are something that students really get interested in. Very motivating for language learning and it brings the learning focus into the wider world and gets kids thinking, critically thinking. Even active. Further, these games are for the most part authentic. That can pose a challenge for many students but because of the strong context provided through visuals / text / audio in these game, that isn't a big problem. One other feature of these games is that they will take time and are for the most part, script based.

So here are the Top (free / no need to download) games for learning about global issues:


1. Darfur is dying. A game where the student lives the life of a refugee camp member and has to make decisions in order to survive.

2. Sim's Sweatshop. Students learn about life as a sweatshop worker. Really attractive and well put together. Students actually work, gain a wage and get to feel what life might be like for those in a sweatshop.

3. Spent. The player must make spending decisions as an unemployed worker and try to survive what life throws at them.

4. Finding Zoe. In two handy age levels, students try to find Zoe and deal with all the social relationship problems that come along. Promotes tolerance and good relationships between girls and boys.

5. Student Survivor. A student navigates through the quagmire that is university life and tries to survive.

Notable mentions: Ayiti the Cost of Life, Electrocity, Play the News and Quizzes with a social conscious (Aid to children, Free Rice, Free Poverty

All of these games and many more along the same lines (I'll try to aggragate and make one category) can be found on the  EFL Classroom 2.0 game page.

Scrabble

Scrabble. It's an iconic word, game. I'm surprised we don't use it as an adjective - like, "I've been scrabbled". Today, I was going over some of my past writings, all hidden away in boxes and notebooks. Came across a "feuilliton", a reflective essay that I wrote about scrabble years ago. I won't bore you with it - but I will share some great info. and amazing resources for Scrabble. { caveat: I'm not a big fan of using word games in the classroom -…
Author:- ddeubel

scrabble2Scrabble.

It's an iconic word, game. I'm surprised we don't use it as an adjective - like, "I've been scrabbled".

Today, I was going over some of my past writings, all hidden away in boxes and notebooks. Came across a "feuilliton", a reflective essay that I wrote about scrabble years ago. I won't bore you with it - but I will share some great info. and amazing resources for Scrabble.

{ caveat: I'm not a big fan of using word games in the classroom - but they do have their place, like a dictionary does }

1. Watch this "Crazy" presentation about Scrabble. 'nough said, it will speak for itself.

craziest

2. Get some resources.

Online Scrabble games - The OriginalBLAST. SPRINT

Print and play Junior Scrabble game.

Icon Scrabble. Make a word using scrabble like tiles.


4. Don't know how to play? Watch these video tutorials.


5. Watch a few classic scrabble videos! The Big Snit (award winning animation) and Death by Scrabble.


6. Make your own "BIG" Scrabble game like this teacher did for a summer camp!

scrabblesummercampdaecheonJuly132008

Top Game Generators

The "Top" games series continues! It seems the categories are limitless..... Today, I'd like to tackle "Game generators". A game generator is a site or program that makes it easy for a teacher or student to make a game. (and I mention student because the optimum way to use a generator for language learning is getting students to make the games). Game generators can be elaborate or simple, they can be plain or full of…
Author:- ddeubel

juiceThe "Top" games series continues! It seems the categories are limitless.....

Today, I'd like to tackle "Game generators". A game generator is a site or program that makes it easy for a teacher or student to make a game. (and I mention student because the optimum way to use a generator for language learning is getting students to make the games). Game generators can be elaborate or simple, they can be plain or full of sparkles. But what counts at the end of the day is that they function well and don't take up a lot of the teacher's/student's time (nor have a sharp learning curve).


So here are the Top (free) generators as I see them....


1. Fling the Teacher. This game is super easy but generates a powerfully attractive and addictive game. Just add questions and answers/possible answers. Here's an example. One of many on our Games page of EFL Classroom 2.0

2. QuizBreak. Brought to you by CLEAR (Univ. of Michigan's - Center for Language Education and Research), it makes a Jeopardy style quiz game with the possibility of all kinds of multi media inserts. Works well and makes an attractive game. Will store your game permanently (you can't download). Read my full review.

3. ESLVideo. This site allows you to make quick quizzes using Youtube videos. Students can share, teachers can embed the quizzes. Students email the results to teachers for tracking. It's been around a long time but is still keeping up with the times!

4. QuizStar. Makes a very attractive quiz with photos/audio that you can show your students afterwords. Tracking of student answers and reporting is possible too. The drawback is that you need to assign a class / create a class. There is no fully public version. But the 4Teachers.org does a great job offering tools to teachers (like Rubistar too!).

5. Purpose Games. This site has been around a long while and developed well. Teachers can create very attractive interactive games (see this sample) and is especially effective for vocabulary. No registration except if you want to make a game.

Next up - Paid quiz generators and random generators!

The Top 5 Games I've Made

Continuing on with the series of Top 5 games posts - today, I'm offering up the top games I've created. Games not based on any other concept but what I've thought up. I got into making my own games simply because I saw so much "possibility". A way for me to be creative in the classroom and prime my own teacher development. There is a lot that goes into making a great game; 1. Engagement. How…
Author:- ddeubel

top5Continuing on with the series of Top 5 games posts - today, I'm offering up the top games I've created. Games not based on any other concept but what I've thought up.

I got into making my own games simply because I saw so much "possibility". A way for me to be creative in the classroom and prime my own teacher development. There is a lot that goes into making a great game;

1. Engagement. How to keep the students "there" and in the game.

2. Construction. How to make the game visually attractive and simple for a teacher/student to use/play.

3. Content. What to put in the game so it will be valuable for language learning.

Mostly, to make a great game, you have to really have a solid understanding of how students learn. That's what excited me, to make something that better helped students learn because the game understood implicitly, what kept students ticking and piecing together language in their brains. To me, game making isn't just Q and A - there is much deeper possibility.

I'm now risking boring you to death! So let the games begin - here are the Top 5 games I've made with an example and all available for download through the games folder on EFL Classroom 2.0.

1. One of These Things Is Not Like The Others. This game gets my top vote because of how it focuses and fosters student critical thinking skills while at the same time, keeping things simple. Students are presented with 4 images and must produce sentences stating why one thing is different from the others. Here's a nice Picasa slideshow version I made (just pause and then use the arrow keys to advance)

2. Top 5. In this Family Feud styled game, students brainstorm the top 5 words for a category. Then they check and get points depending on the rank of their answer. Worksheet included and check out the video a teacher made using the game. It can get noisy!

3. BAAM. Teachers have gone mad over this game. Possibly because it has templates of different length, possibly because in this game, any team could win right up to the last round/chance! Easy to put in your own content and a very simple concept. Simplicity is its key and strength.

4. What the Wordle. I'm really proud of this game (not really a game but a concept). I saw the power and beauty of Wordle and thought I could use that to make attractive games. The next key was to put it together using PicasaWeb. Bingo. You have a simple game of slides with hours of interaction / learning. See the whole directory here.

5. Lastonestanding. This game is a classic that you play with any audio or song. Students love it and it fosters great listening skills. Always a winner and a team winner!

Honorable Mentions. Transl8it.com / Story Dominoes / Pass the Paper / Bingo Basic

Top Power Point Games

Still enjoying the series on games!   Power point games are something I REALLY know a thing or two about. I have made hundreds and also designed dozens of my own games from scratch. They are great because a teacher can take any game, edit and then have personalized content for their own class.…
Author:- ddeubel

powerpointStill enjoying the series on games!   Power point games are something I REALLY know a thing or two about. I have made hundreds and also designed dozens of my own games from scratch. They are great because a teacher can take any game, edit and then have personalized content for their own class.

See the list of  all the games.

So let's get started ...........

#1.  BAAM.   Without a doubt.  This is a game I created. Very basic but engaging. It solves a problem with many games - how to keep students engaged when after a few questions/rounds, they know who'll probably win? With BAAM any team could win, right up to the last moment. 3 sizes of templates. Really engaging and dynamic.

#2. Jeopardy. A Classic. Also flash versions are available. So many styles, many with the full sound/beeps and effects. Flash versions available too. If you are into making your own games - try Quiz Break for a great game generator for embedding audio/video into the game.

#3. Pass the Paper. Another game I created based on a regular game played in classrooms. Students in groups pass around a piece of paper while music plays. When the music stops, the person with the piece of paper must answer the questions on the screen or do what is asked. It'll get noisy, be prepared!  Here's one of many flash versions also available for click and play.

#4. What the Wordle.  Wordle brought vocabulary study into the web 2.0 age. What the Wordle is a series of vocabulary games based on wordle pictures. Lots of types and a real "thinking" style of game. See the picasa library here (non power point) - just set the play button to pause and use the arrow keys to advance/go back. Here's an example. (also a creative way to use Picasa in education!)

 

#5.  Top 5. This is the first game I ever came up with. Based on the Family Feud style of game but for language learners. Get the worksheet and play with it. Both group and individual point winners.  Super engaging game that students can't get enough of....


Get many templates here but you can also just download any game and then edit with your own content and use as a template.

Honorable mentions: Transl8it ,  The Price is Right, Guess Who, One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others

Top 5 "TV Style" games

I'm quite enjoying the process of making a decision about " The Top" games and find previous lists HERE and HERE. The GAMES and…
Author:- ddeubel

GameShow2I'm quite enjoying the process of making a decision about " The Top" games and find previous lists HERE and HERE. The GAMES and ARCADE pages on EFL Classroom 2.0 are really popular and I think for good reason. [in fact today's selection is all available in the Learning Arcade]

Today's category is special. These TV style games really grab the student's attention and can be brilliantly motivating (but be careful to keep the class under control - it can get noisy). The class is like the audience and you can play so that there are prizes on the line.

One thing to note - they are authentic so the language can be a little difficult.

Next will be the Top 5 Powerpoint games for teaching language!

So here it goes....

1.The Price is Right. There will be lots of noise in the classroom for this one! Very interactive and "real". Students can use their own small whiteboard to write down/guess their own prices and play along. Read my full post about using The Price is Right in class!

2. Who Wants To Be a Millionaire. I'm a big fan of regular trivia games to promote language learning and interest. Great for practicing questions and very motivating for "brainy" students!

3. Deal or No Deal. Fantastic for practicing large numbers. One half of the class can "play", the other half can be the banker. Switch. See who made the best deal! Really works...

4. The Wheel of Fortune. Similar to the hangman style of Spinners Luck - it really is like the real thing! Students guess topics like Movies, Book titles etc...

5. Blockbusters. The real deal - like the famous British TV Show. Students pick a letter and then answer a question using that letter as the start. Very interactive, like the real thing. From the same people who brought us Price is Right.

Honorable Mention: Family Feud Jeopardy for 2nd lang. learners (scroll down the games page to the bottom for more like this).

Top 5 "educational" and traditional games

Following up on yesterday's Top 5 online games for learning - today I offer my Top 5 that are more "traditional". By that I mean they are more controlled and less authentic. Quizzes, Q and A trivia, mix and match, multiple choice - you get the idea. Still, if done well, they can be really effective learning tools or even assessment tools. They are meant to be used by students at…
Author:- ddeubel

quizFollowing up on yesterday's Top 5 online games for learning - today I offer my Top 5 that are more "traditional".

By that I mean they are more controlled and less authentic. Quizzes, Q and A trivia, mix and match, multiple choice - you get the idea. Still, if done well, they can be really effective learning tools or even assessment tools. They are meant to be used by students at home or in a language lab but can also be used in a classroom with a large monitor/screen. (and you'll see a lot of great apps like these games - coming to mobile technology! A few have started and I'll review shortly. )

Forthcoming - The Top 5 TV style games for language learning.

So here it goes.....

#1 British Council's: Beat the clock. Great quizzes. Very traditional but they get number one for the sheer quantity and shortness (so users get feedback).

#2 Spelling Bee. This is for L1 learners but works also for second language learners. A listening cloze and then students must put in the correct word. Multiple levels. Great audio

#3 Free Rice and better for lower levels, Aid to Children. Vocabulary quizzes that adapt content to how well you do. Get answers right, get higher leveled words. Get answers wrong, get tested with lower level words. Plus - donate food to the needy with every correct answer!

#4 ELLLO games. Excellent listening material with photos. A lot of their stuff is a little hard to navigate and dense but the games listening quizzes are wonderful works of art. Great for students.

#5 Spiderman. I had to include this here! It is addictive and along with a smiliar Letter Rip just take learning to a new level of "game".

Honorable Mentions: Tutpup. EnglishCentral Learn Quizzes. Quizlet Flashcard games. (click a set and then click the games underneath the main window.

I've made it a kind of obsessive quest to catalog games on EFL Classroom. Use our GAMES page for a start. But also, the ARCADE and the GOAL GAMES.  Others there too - try our Learning Lab!

A-Z The Alphabet Game

This A-Z game can be used before a speaking/reading/writing class to generate some background knowledge, or could be used for vocabulary revision. The only materials needed are A-Z worksheet per group, a white board and 3 board markers. Steps: 1.Ask students to get into three groups (green, blue and red). 2.Write the topic on the whiteboard. 3.Distribute the alphabet- an “…
Author:- Nesrin Eren

This A-Z game can be used before a speaking/reading/writing class to generate some background knowledge, or could be used for vocabulary revision. The only materials needed are A-Z worksheet per group, a white board and 3 board markers.
Steps:
1.Ask students to get into three groups (green, blue and red).
2.Write the topic on the whiteboard.
3.Distribute the alphabet- an “A-Z sheet” to each group.
4.Get them to generate some ideas related to the topic. Have students find words starting with each letter.
5.Meanwhile, write the letters of the alphabet on the white board in three columns (A,B,C…Z)
6.Once students have generated a list of words related to the topic, each group is then given a pen of the color of their group. Ask each group to stand in a line facing the white board.
7.The members standing at the front in the line from each group runs to the board and write a word next to a letter of their choice. (Three members at the board are writing their words at the same time). Once they have written a word/phrase, then they quickly run back to the group and give the pen to then next member in the line for them to write another word. If one letter is already chosen, the others don’t have the chance to use that letter anymore.
8.When all the letters have been used, the game is over.
9.Go over each word checking spelling and meaning with the students. Students are also required to explain and support their findings, if agreed among the groups, the group gets the point. The ones who have the most words are the winner!

Enjoy!

Hey! Let’s go out and play!

(from my blog) Hey! Let’s go out and play! Remember the time your best friend calling your name from the front yard saying: “Hey! Let’s go out and play!”. Wouldn’t you immediately leave everything, no matter what it was, and run out to join your friends?… Those were the days! Sadly, this is something we don’t hear very often these days. Instead, children are busy with their iPhones and computers. What about in class? Do we really give the importance to…
Author:- Nesrin Eren

(from my blog)

Hey! Let’s go out and play!

Remember the time your best friend calling your name from the front yard saying: “Hey! Let’s go out and play!”. Wouldn’t you immediately leave everything, no matter what it was, and run out to join your friends?… Those were the days! Sadly, this is something we don’t hear very often these days. Instead, children are busy with their iPhones and computers.

What about in class? Do we really give the importance to playing games? Research indicates that “play is cru­cial to phys­i­cal, intel­lec­tual, and social-emotional devel­op­ment at all ages” (Elkind, 2008, ¶3), which is also a means for learning (The National Institute for Play, n.d.).

Stuart Brown- a physician and director of the National Institute for Play, says that “nothing lights up the brain like plays” (TED Conference, 2008).  Why shouldn’t we, teachers, then make use of this opportunity where both parties could have some fun and make the experience a valuable one?

Ultimately, teaching is about how much our students achieve by the end of the lesson. While planning our lessons, at one stage, incorporating some sort of games that are linked to the lesson objective would not only be an important learning experience but also a fun one in which most students would actively take part- let it be a warmer, and energizer, or a closure.

Some students may find games useless; nonetheless, when the aim(s) of the game  is underlined, they will know why they are playing  it.  Asking students to think and call out the aim(s) of the game can help game-resistant students hear what others have come up with, which could be a great way to create awareness on the importance of games in learning.  We should bear in mind that problems arise when the aim is not clarified; that is when we lose the opportunity to have students see it as a learning tool.

The question is then where in the lesson should we have our students play? My suggestion would be at the beginning of a new lesson to warm up students to the subject/language that will be studied, or as a wrap-up of the lesson to reinforce the learning points. The time spent on the game should also be considered in terms of the weighting of the whole lesson. Let’s say we have two hours of 50-minute lessons, not spending more than 10-15 minutes on the game would be fine.

Please watch Stuart Brown’s talk about play. His presentation includes some interesting findings which not only we, teachers, should consider but everyone else if we want to be surrounded with individuals that have a more empowered life.

O.K. Now, it’s time to share some games I have found useful. Some time ago, I came across with a very nice game called “Go Fshing” posted by Victor Mejia under ‘Teaching Recipes ‘ on David Deubelbeiss ‘s blog- ELT Classroom. Here is how it is done: (I have copied and pasted as it is from the page for those who don’t have the access to the page).

Read more at :http://nesrineren.edublogs.org/category/lesson-planning/

The #1 .....(review game generator)

Is it hard to motivate your students sometimes? Don't have much time for elaborate tools? Are you looking for a way to create more classroom "togetherness"? Looking for a unique way to review material and informally assess student's language acquisition/level? Look no further than this fun and so practical game developed by a great history teacher, Andrew Field. Fling the Teacher is a "Content generator" style game. Meaning, you the teacher just…
Author:- ddeubel

Is it hard to motivate your students sometimes? Don't have much time for elaborate tools? Are you looking for a way to create more classroom "togetherness"? Looking for a unique way to review material and informally assess student's language acquisition/level? Look no further than this fun and so practical game developed by a great history teacher, Andrew Field.


Fling the Teacher is a "Content generator" style game. Meaning, you the teacher just enter the information and it generates the game. Even better if you assign students to create the review game and even run the show! It is available through one of Andrew's sites called Content Generator Just scroll down and find the game. Press "free" and follow along. View the screencast below as I show you how to download and make a game. It is simple as pie!.

Here is one I made about Korea. (where I used to teach). Can you fling the teacher?

Here is another example game which shows how you might use it to review grammar in your classroom. I also think this might be a great way to assess language, keep making the questions harder and harder and when the student stops, that is their level!

Get others that teachers have shared, on the EFL Classroom 2.o game page.

How do you play? It is basically everyone against the teacher. Just answer 15 questions correctly and you Fling the teacher. You get 3 "hints" (ask the audience, ask the prof., take away 2) along the way. You can dress up the teacher as you wish.

To make your own game, just enter your question and then the correct answer along with 3 incorrect answers. The Content Generator will automatically mix up the answers and then after you have entered 15 Questions and answers generate a .swf or Shockwave Flash file. This will play in your browser usually (or download the adobe plug in )but to get a big screen player, download the free one at Eolsoft.

How to use this in class?

I play in teams. When one team is unable to continue - the next team repeats from the start and tries to fling the teacher. The repetition really helps language learning! Also, appoint an MC to read the questions and direct. The teacher should just sit back and let the students run the show!

Further, these games should be put up on a school website or wiki so that students can play and review at home. Also, get the students making the games - this is where Web 2.0 really kicks in and students learn so much more making materials/tests than actually doing the tests.

I'd love other teachers to start making more Fling the Teacher Games so we could create a directory of games like the one already at EFL Classroom 2.0

I have several criteria for what makes a top notch language game - Fling the Teacher meets most of them.

1) educational - not just click and kill

2) text to speech. All text should have an audio component.

3) ease of use. Not complicated, idiot proof.

4) visuals - not just text based

Get Flinging the Teacher Today!!!!!!!

ELT Games

ELT gamesis a nice "basic" resource site. All the resources are interactive and task based/conversation based. Students must use the information provided to communicate in "real" language terms. The teacher just needs to cut up the materials and distribute and explain (better demonstrate) the task well. I've always been a person who tells all the teachers I train that their best friend isn't a computer, a textbook or even a C.D - it is a pair of…
Author:- EFL Classroom

ELT gamesis a nice "basic" resource site. All the resources are interactive and task based/conversation based. Students must use the information provided to communicate in "real" language terms. The teacher just needs to cut up the materials and distribute and explain (better demonstrate) the task well. I've always been a person who tells all the teachers I train that their best friend isn't a computer, a textbook or even a C.D - it is a pair of scissors! ELT games follows that philosophy to the letter.

The activities (I wouldn't really call most of them "games".) are well organized into appropriate levels. Nice teacher instructions to boot. The only downside is that there is a dearth of visual support materials for the content. It is rather dry. But a teacher can provide this and this site is definitely worth checking out. Also click on Cartoons. A nice site there with some very creative cartoons about teaching.

Let's Celebrate World Animal Day


Author:- Susan Stephenson, the Book Chook


 

Today is World Animal Day. To celebrate, why not encourage kids to think of the animals you care about, spend time with your pets, or maybe visit a zoo or a farm. You could take your art tools outside and capture a portrait of an animal, grab a photo, or write a description. As a follow-up, your kids might like to visitTalking Pet, where they can upload a photo of their pet, or select one from the site, and create a message for it to deliver.

Why not research and write about animal heroes - the cuddliest, fastest, cutest, smallest, or most amazing animal kids know. Have them explain their choice, or try and persuade somebody else their choice is correct.

Listen to Saint-Saens' Carnival of the Animals and decide on your favourite piece - mine is Le Cygne.

Share a Book! Ask your kids to look for a book about animals, at home or at the library. Don't forget the non-fiction section. Some of my favourite animal picture books include: Owl Babies by Martin Waddell and Patrick Benson, Columbia Sneezes by Janeen Brian and Gabe Cunnett , Where is the Green Sheep by Mem Fox and Judy Horacek, Birdsong by Ellie Sandall, The Elephant and the Bad Baby by Elfrida Vipont and Raymond Briggs, Possum Magic by Mem Fox and Julie Vivas, any of the Hairy Maclary books by Lynley Dodd, There's a Hippopotamus on our Roof Eating Cake by Hazel Edwards and Deborah Niland, By Jingo! an alphabet of animals by Janeen Brian and Dee Huxley, and Rhino Neil by Mini Goss.

Some outstanding picture books about Australian animals are Silly Galah by Janeen Brian and Cheryll Johns, Pobblebonks by Garry Fleming, By Jingo! an alphabet of animals, by Janeen Brian and Dee Huxley, Baby Bilby, where do you sleep by Narelle Oliver, Diary of a Wombat by Jackie French and Bruce Whatley, Wombat Divine by Mem Fox and Kerry Argent.

Here are some websites that would be perfect to visit on World Animal Day:

WhoPooped

Kids look at animal scat and try to work out who left it behind. It's great to get kids observing and thinking about what they see around them outside, and this site might nudge them in that direction. The title is also bound to nudge them into giggles.

Whose Poo

Denver Zoo's Whose Poo is another fascinating insight into insides and what comes out of them.

ARKive

What the Book Chook said: If your youngster loves animals, loves to learn about them and examine them closely, this website is the next best thing to real life. Information is clear and engaging, and is written by people who are qualified biologists. And the images are brilliant!

Creature Creator at Underland Chronicles

Create a creature online, or piggyback on the idea and invent your own mix and match animal by designing bodies, legs and heads on paper.

Here are some cute baby animals at WebEcoist. Great inspiration for a story or two.

Zooborns is such a gorgeous website. It has wonderful pictures of baby animals, and you can sort by animal name or zoo name. It also has a list of baby animal names, although I'm not sure how accurate they are - is a baby porcupine really a porcupette? This is a great place to browse and read with your kids, playing conversation games like "Find the cutest animal." or "For my next pet I want a..." The Book Chook is torn between a baby aardvark, a baby aye-aye called Smeagol, (take a look and you'll see why!) and a baby giraffe. But Mr Meanie Book Chook says "No." Hmph.

Canon Creative Park have some great paper crafts about animals.

If you're looking for an online game to play involving animals, I like the sound of this one, described on MakeUseOf.com recently. Web Earth Online is a multi player online game where you play as animals in an environmental web based world of nature. The basic game is free. I didn't have time to try it and there are no seven-year-olds in the house to explain it to me, but it certainly sounds like fun.

Here are some videos you might like to share with your kids to celebrate World Animal Day:
Viral Animal Videos from WebEcoist, Mashable's Funniest Dog Videos and Funniest Cat Videos.

If you live in the UK, check out BBC Animals.

I loved the sound of National Geographic's Wildlife Filmmaker which I read about at I Learn Technology, one of my favourite blogs. But I think it might only work for US people as the screen was blank for me. Kelly says, It "lets students make custom nature films complete with animal video clips, sounds, music, and text captions. The site is easy to use and films can be saved on the site or shared through email."

Finally, I hope you have time to watch
this clip about the intriguing relationship between an elephant and a dog.


What will YOU do to celebrate World Animal Day?

The #1 .....( review game)

** Not your ordinary, endless list - just what's number 1.                         BAAM I created this power point game a few years ago and since then, it has become a classic. Most visited resource on EFL Classroom 2.0…
Author:- ddeubel

Number One** Not your ordinary, endless list - just what's number 1.

                        BAAM


I created this power point game a few years ago and since then, it has become a classic. Most visited resource on EFL Classroom 2.0 with combined downloads of 30,000! That's a lot of BAAM games floating out there.

It is the perfect way for teachers to review their course content. Just put in your own questions / prompts into one of 3 templates (mini(10), medium (15) large (25)) and you'll have a great time with students. Even better - get the students to prepare a BAAM game to play in class.

BAAMTemplatemediumI came up with the idea after being told many times by teachers that the standard Jeopardy game was okay but the lower level students just lost interest and "tuned out". I wondered to myself how I could create a simple game where that would have an element of unexpected chance so to keep the attention of lower level (quite bewildered by a second language) students. BAAM was born. Even up to the last question, you don't know which team has won.

One tip - get one student on each team to be their team's scorekeeper or appoint someone to do it on the board. You are too busy doing other things as the teacher.

You can also play the low tech, non power point version of BAAM. 

Get Alphabet Versions HERE.

Don't just play games - make games!

Katie Salen in the video, outlines a new school concept (well, not really new but innovative anyway) - a school where the curriculum is totally based around "gaming". Yeah, that's right, GAMES. No, the students aren't sitting around all day playing computer games. Rather, they are learning valuable…
Author:- ddeubel


Katie Salen in the video, outlines a new school concept (well, not really new but innovative anyway) - a school where the curriculum is totally based around "gaming". Yeah, that's right, GAMES.

No, the students aren't sitting around all day playing computer games. Rather, they are learning valuable skills by making games. Critical thinking, cooperation, synthesis, debate, leadership, delegation, design and many more high order skills that will be in demand this century. Now this is preparing students today for tomorrow!

I'm a big guy for bringing games into the EFL Classroom. However, I'd like to ask teachers to try and go beyond the playing of games and actually getting their students to make the games. I'm sure many classrooms have students who could make the Jeopardy, Transl8it, Flingtheteacher, Baam and other games. As they do - they will learn more English than you can ever imagine - also so many other skills.

That's my challenge. Let it digest and then come out hitting!

Here's a nice worksheet for preparing to make a Jeopardy game. Give to groups and let them design the questions then make the game on the computer!
How do you get your students "making" games/content? Any ideas to share?

Akinator

Akinator is a guessing game site that is super simple and easy to use in the class or at home. Much like 20q.net which I've used very successfully in class - the Akinator will guess whatever celebrity/fa mous person you have chosen. Guess by asking questions. Very simple set up of responses ( Yes, Probably, Don't know, Probably not, No). He guessed everyone I choose (Obama, Shakespeare, Britney) and your…
Author:- EFL Classroom


Akinator is a guessing game site
that is super simple and easy to use in the class or at home. Much like 20q.net which I've used very successfully
in class - the Akinator will guess whatever celebrity/famous person you
have chosen. Guess by asking questions. Very simple set up of responses
( Yes, Probably, Don't know, Probably not, No). He guessed everyone I
choose (Obama, Shakespeare, Britney) and your students will find this
amazing.

Tips for using this are 2 fold.

One,
don't choose anyone too obscure, keep it simple. Or try it out before class so you know it will work with
that given celebrity (for 20q, I use chopsticks and it is a good object
to start with).

Two, have one student be the show MC and read the questions for the class that the Akinator replies with....

Have fun and also see this Let's Talk Celebrity guessing game!

A Journey in TEFL

Games vs Handouts Last week I explained how to reduce relative clauses into phrases to my 11 graders and they were all confused. Then I distributed the handouts I prepared for them to rewrite the sentences. While doing the exercises they were bored and Moreover, they couldn’t get the idea.The following day I played a game with them and they were more confident in the end.The game…
Author:- Eva Büyüksimkeşyan

Games vs Handouts

Last week I explained how to reduce relative clauses into phrases to my 11 graders and they were all confused. Then I distributed the handouts I prepared for them to rewri
te the sentences. While doing the exercises they were bored and Moreover, they couldn’t get the idea.
The following day I played a game with them and they were more confident in the end.
The game was one of my favourites, noughts and crosses,(or tic-tac-toe) as I can adapt it to many grammar topic.

I wrote sentences on slips of papers and put them in an envelope. I divided my class into two teams and told them how to play the game. They had to choose a box from the grid all together as a team and one by one in turns, they had to take a slip of paper from the envelope and reduce the relative clause. I allowed them to look at their notes while waiting for their turn and in the end the victory was for all of us.
I gave them post- it notes and asked them to write feedback. I also asked them to compare doing exercises and playing grammar games.
My students were happy with the game and they explained the pros and cons of playing games in classroom very well.
They said:


Pros

We focused on the rules.
We were more careful
We tried to learn and remember the rules not to lose the game
We saw our mistakes
We wanted to win
We remember better
We practised the relative clauses
We had fun.
It was more enjoyable than writing on a handout
We did something like competition and it makes you try harder
Cons

Losing a game is not good
I get so nervous when I play a game
We could have practised more if I did them on handouts
In every classroom, you will find competitive students who will enjoy playing games and in every classroom you will have students who will become unhappy when s/he loses a game. But life is a game and we should learn how to play, how to survive, how to win and we should also learn how to overcome stress.

What 2 Learn -- A Great Game / Quiz Generator!

What 2 Learn is a sterling, easy to use game generator. Students need this kind of feedback and can have fun playing these games to review lesson content/vocabulary either as a whole class or individually (the school no longer has 4 walls!). We already have our very popular Fling the Teacher game generator (scroll down) that many teachers use. Though…
Author:- EFL Classroom

What 2 Learn is a sterling, easy to use game generator. Students need this kind of feedback and can have fun playing these games to review lesson content/vocabulary either as a whole class or individually (the school no longer has 4 walls!).

We already have our very popular Fling the Teacher game generator (scroll down) that many teachers use. Though What 2 Learn is tied to a site, it is superior in several ways.

1. Only put in 8 questions!
2. Variety of game types / designs
3. You get a "teacher's code" and from your dashboard can invite and track students.

It's easy as pie to make a game. I even think it wonderful if teachers can get students making the games for play by other students! I've made 3 this week - see them on our Winter Olympics page. Here's one I made using their new "skydiver" design.

Try W2L with your students, they'll love it!

Directions PPT

Directions.ppt I made this PPT to teach a lesson on directions in my class. It starts out with really basic vocab (up, down, left, right) then gets a little more difficult. There are a few slides in which I ask the students to give me the…
Author:- Morgan C. Reynolds

Directions.ppt

I made this PPT to teach a lesson on directions in my class. It starts out with really basic vocab (up, down, left, right) then gets a little more difficult.

There are a few slides in which I ask the students to give me the control-pad directions for performing special moves in various video games. This was my initial concept, but it sort of fell flat due to lack of material. It is actually hard to find screen shots from classic video games, let alone animations (as was my initial intent). Regardless, the students LOVED this. It hovered around the basics, but the attention they gave me afterwards was well worth it.

The last slide is a map of some part of England (I think). At that point I ask the students how to get to various places.

The lesson also included an information gap activity with directions to the COEX Mall and a local IBK branch, but that is on my computer at school which can't access this website without freezing (all of a sudden).

A lot of the lesson is kind of silly, but with my morning class full of soccer players I need it to get through the lesson.

In the last 10 minutes of class, I ask them to draw me a map of the school and give me directions to the cafeteria. Some of them get pretty inventive. "Jump through window. Break down wall. Fly across soccer field" etc.

P.S. depending on the version of PowerPoint you use the presentation may come out a little wonky.

Also see this presentation.

Using Flashcards to Teach Languages

                                 Get The E-Book WHY? Games are fun and motivational. They increase student talk time (production). Visuals add context to the language learning. They are quick and…
Author:- ddeubel


                                 Get The E-Book

WHY? Games are fun and motivational. They increase student talk time (production).
Visuals add context to the language learning. They are quick and easy to
use. They allow for repetition and proper scaffolding of the learning.

WHERE? Flashcards are now cheap to obtain and so powerful. Get hundreds of sets HERE Also, visit EFL Classroom’s sharing area). Vocabulary power points can easily be printed [File – Print Preview – “x” slides/page – Print] and cut up by students for use. If you have the time, print an empty BINGO card and have the students draw/label their own cards! You can also just photocopy from books then cut these pictures up.  I also highly recommend the use of Picture Sets - a great resource.

WHICH? Use flashcards in the L2! Either without a label or with a label on the back. If
you print and they don’t have labels – get your students to label them!

WHEN? Anytime! They can be used to assess student ability/knowledge. As a review
or formative tool. As an “study” part of the lesson to practice language
in a controlled fashion. Or just as a fun, “activating” part of a lesson.

TIPS? ** Laminate your “good” card sets.
** Keep in labeled envelops or zip lock bags.
** Set up your classroom so it is easy for students to be grouped or spread out.
** Have a strict set of signs and signals to manage students.
** Model the game in front of the whole class with a few students. Go slow!
** Get students to invent their own games!

___________________________________________________________________

HOW? There are literally a zillion ways to use flashcards to teach. Here are a few of
them lumped into some main categories.


1. MEMORY
This is probably the most simple and repetitive type of game. There are many variations.

a) Recall. One student shows the student(s) a flashcard and the others try to make a sentence or simply state the name of the card. The student “teacher” checks on the back label and if correct puts in a “correct” pile. If incorrect, it is set aside for review later.

b) Memory Story. One student picks up a card and makes a statement using some target language. For example. “Yesterday I went shopping and bought ……..” The next student turns up a card and continues. “Yesterday I went shopping and bought a … and a ……”

c) Concentration. There are two sets of flashcards. Either picture/picture or picture / word. Students attempt to turn over and match from both sets. If they do so, they may continue. The student with the most pairs at the end, wins. Here’s an online example. http://tiny.cc/MZwhY Many like this on our Game page.

d) Snap. The cards are face up on the table. The teacher says a sentence and the first student to “snap” or slap the right card gets to keep it. The most cards at the end, wins. You can play this full class by putting large flashcards on the board and having students run up to the blackboard and slap the correct flashcard.

_______________________________________________________________________

2. GRAMMAR

These games use some target language which the teacher models and puts in the board. Students play the game using the flashcards and the designated language structure. Many times, the language can be a closed question / answer (ex. Did you ….. last night? – Yes, I did / No, I didn’t)

Some example grammar structures:

Do you like …… / Do you usually …….. / Do you have …….

Did you ……… yesterday? Have you ever ……… ? Will you …… tomorrow?

a) Go Fish. Use two sets. Students in groups of 3 or 4 ask each other questions using the target language. If the student asked has that card, they must give it and that student collects a pair. They may continue until they don’t collect. If a student runs out of cards, they pick up some more cards to continue. Most pairs at the end wins.

b) Survey. Give each student a card. They survey others around the class using their vocabulary flashcard. Ex. Have you ever…..? Report back to the group or the class using the structure –

All
Most
Some of us ………
Few
None

c) Conversation prompt. There is one pile of cards in the middle. One student turns over a card and using the flashcard as a prompt – asks another student a question. That student responds with one sentence. The other students in the group must ask one follow up question each.

Some example prompts:

When did you last ……? / Have you ever …….? / Do you prefer ……. Or ..........?

If someone ......... , what would you do? / What do you think about ………?

d) Find your match! Copy some flashcards in different numbers. 6 of one, 5 of one, 4 of one 3 of one etc… Give one card to each student. Using the target language on the board, the students must go around the classroom and find other students with a similar card. If they find a match, they link arms and continue trying to find others with a similar card. (Ex. “ I love ……. What about you? “ “Oh, I love …… . Bye.” ) Alternatively – students can choose their own response from the items brainstormed on the blackboard. Have them use a post it to create their own flashcard!

e) The “You Can” Game. A person in a group turns over a flashcard. They must make a statement/sentence using “can”. Ex. You can …….. or An / A ……. can….. Continue around the group awarding a point for each statement.

f) Guessing Game. Create some sets of flashcards with common people / places / things. One learner picks up a flashcard and describes it using

It is a thing that ….
It is a place where ….
It is a person who ….

The first student to correctly guess it, wins the card. Most cards when time is up, wins.

_________________________________________________________________________

3. CLASSROOM ACTION GAMES


These games use flashcards to get students moving around the classroom and competing.

a) Charades. Bring a student to the front of the class. Show them a flashcard. They must act out the object / action. The other students guess or a team guesses as many as possible in one minute. The next team tries to beat them. Make sure they use full sentences! (ex. He is an elephant!) . After a whole class demonstration, get students doing this in small groups.

b) Pictionary. Same as charades only this time instead of acting out the flashcard, they must draw it. You can also have multiple teams drawing on the board – first team to guess the correct word wins.

c) Telephone Whisper. Put your students in rows. Show the last person in the row a flashcard. They must make a sentence with an adjective (ex. It is a huge elephant) and whisper it to the next person. Continue until it gets to the front of the class. That student writes the phrase on the board. If it is a the same as the flashcard – a point is awarded.


4. OPEN ENDED GAMES

These games are for higher level students and give them an opportunity to use language in a meaningful and fuller manner.

a) Story Dominoes. One stack of cards in the middle. A student picks up a card and starts a story, stating one sentence. The next student picks up a card and continues the story. And so on until the last card when the story concludes. Start again and see if the group can recall and repeat the story!

b) Liar, Liar pants on Fire! Each student in the group gets 3 flashcards. They must make a statement about each flashcard and their life. One must be a lie. The other students guess which one is the lie. Ex. (for animals): I like crocodiles. / I have seen a giraffe in real life. / I have kissed a dog . Which is the lie?

c) Making Connections.
Use two sets of assorted flashcards. Spread them out into two groups. Students must make a sentence using a flashcard from both sides. Ex. An elephant (a) doesn’t like to swim(b). Continue until all cards are matched.

d) Not like the others. Use a set of assorted flashcards. Students turn over 4 cards and put them face up in the middle. Students must make statements why one is different from the others using the phrase, A/An ……. is not like the others because …….. A point awarded for all logical answers. When students run out of statements, start with a new set of four flashcards.

e) Discussions. Students turn over a card and state their opinion about the topic of the card. Go around the group with each student stating their opinion. Discuss.

What the Wordle Part 2 - Using Picasa

I tried to do something different with this presentation of wordles. Simply GO HERE and see them. Play What the Wordle. It is in my Picasa web album - something teachers might use! Go here for many ppts and more What the…
Author:- ddeubel

I tried to do something different with this presentation of wordles. Simply GO HERE and see them. Play What the Wordle. It is in my Picasa web album - something teachers might use!


Go here for many ppts and more What the Wordles!

Reading Software.

Find here an assortment of software that you can use to get students learning to spell, read and do other things....   Also, use to read all text on your computer, the DESKBOT.  Highlight the text - right click and then press read. The Deskbot will read it out loud!   Including games you can play offline and use to set up your own offline computer learning lab.    
Author:- ddeubel

Find here an assortment of software that you can use to get students learning to spell, read and do other things....

 

Also, use to read all text on your computer, the DESKBOT.  Highlight the text - right click and then press read. The Deskbot will read it out loud!

 

Including games you can play offline and use to set up your own offline computer learning lab.

 

 

Quizlet - Making Flashcards

I love using flashcards with students. Used properly, they are a wonder of communicative learning and fostering student autonomy.  Now it is easier to make flashcards or get them!  Use our Quizlet cards! Hundreds of sets instantly printable. Even better, you can display them for full class instruction and at home, later, your students can visit and practice with all the games available to review them!…
Author:- ddeubel

I love using flashcards with students. Used properly, they are a wonder of communicative learning and fostering student autonomy. 


Now it is easier to make flashcards or get them!  Use our Quizlet cards! Hundreds of sets instantly printable. Even better, you can display them for full class instruction and at home, later, your students can visit and practice with all the games available to review them!

1.   Go to Quizlet
2.   Start using our sets. Printing and playing! 
3.   Join our  Quizlet EFL Classroom 2.0 group and be notified of new sets or help us make sets!

4.   Invite students to the site and get them playing! Lots of ways for them to learn online with the flashcards. 

You can upload images with your flashcards. See this world cup example.   Great contextual learning.  Also, the Simpson family.

Also see my blog post and ebook with lots of ideas for teaching with flashcards!

Also, see our resources for flashcards here on EFL Classroom 2.0.  

How can I make these entertaining?

I was wondering if I could find some help.My co-teachers wanted me to create some lessons that have more to do with the American culture. So I decided to create two lesson plans: one on American customs for the next week and one on American superstitions for this week.These are easy topics, however, it's been a bit of a problem getting my students interested in some of the lessons. Especially getting my lower level students more active in class. I guess you can say my well…
Author:- Jay

I was wondering if I could find some help.

My co-teachers wanted me to create some lessons that have more to do with the American culture. So I decided to create two lesson plans: one on American customs for the next week and one on American superstitions for this week.

These are easy topics, however, it's been a bit of a problem getting my students interested in some of the lessons. Especially getting my lower level students more active in class. I guess you can say my well is running dry for interesting ways to teach certain topics, hence the reason for posting here.

So, does anyone have any ideas (activity/game ideas) to get my students motivated and interested in these lessons?

Thanks

PS

I forgot to mention that they are middle school students.

Guess the Google Logo

Here is the presentation - Guess the Google Logo. A nice way to have fun and quiz students. See other suggestions for teaching with this HERE. Also, a nice video about the Google Logo and contest details.You might also try the original Guess the Google game.  Full…
Author:- ddeubel

Here is the presentation - Guess the Google Logo. A nice way to have fun and quiz students. See other suggestions for teaching with this HERE. Also, a nice video about the Google Logo and contest details.

You might also try the original Guess the Google game. 


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# 100 Using Flashcards in your classroom

#100 - Getting Flashy! Using Flash cardsFlashcards are a MUST for the Second language communicative classroom. Even for adults, they add the "compulsion" and "necessity" to…
Author:- Admin

#100 - Getting Flashy! Using Flash cards

Flashcards are a MUST for the Second language communicative classroom. Even for adults, they add the "compulsion" and "necessity" to communicate meaningful information. Further, they can be a game and add spice and curiosity to a lesson. But the $24 question is - How? How if I don't have...............  

Become a Supporterand get the rest of this lesson and hundreds more with downloads, printables and media. Preview all here.



#82 -- Prices. How much is it?

#82 -- Prices. How much is it? This lesson is more a jumble of lesson ideas for prices and shopping lessons. First, have students do .........     Become a Supporter and get the rest of this lesson and hundreds more with downloads, printables…
Author:- Admin

#82 -- Prices. How much is it?

This lesson is more a jumble of lesson ideas for prices and shopping lessons.

First, have students do .........  

 

Become a Supporter and get the rest of this lesson and hundreds more with downloads, printables and media. Preview all here.

 

# 56 Whiteboard Soccer - a simple review game.

Today's Lesson in a Can is just an idea, a game that is very "low tech" but will work in any classroom. It also is easy to control and you won't have any classroom management problems with it! World Cup fever will soon be here and this game is excellent for harnessing that energy for review purposes. First, draw a soccer pitch like that above on the board. To the left and right, draw the flags of each team and this is where the…
Author:- ddeubel

Today's Lesson in a Can is just an idea, a game that is very "low tech" but will work in any classroom. It also is easy to control and you won't have any classroom management problems with it! World Cup fever will soon be here and this game is excellent for harnessing that energy for review purposes.

First, draw a soccer pitch like that above on the board. To the left and right, draw the flags of each team and this is where the score will be kept/marked.

Second, divide the class into two teams (I've had 4 team soccer with two pitches intersecting but it gets rather complicated). Each team will be ..........................

 Become a Supporterand get the rest of this lesson and hundreds more with downloads, printables and media. Preview all here.

Korean Specific Lessons

Let's assemble lessons specifically designed for the Korean context here! There are many all over this site, (for example HERE), search to find them -- but also get many here!   Also, see my presentation and materials on "Culturally Specific Content". Lots of Korean resources there.  Here's my Korean Celebrity -…
Author:- ddeubel

Let's assemble lessons specifically designed for the Korean context here! There are many all over this site, (for example HERE), search to find them -- but also get many here!   Also, see my presentation and materials on "Culturally Specific Content". Lots of Korean resources there. 

Here's my Korean Celebrity - Guess Who game. Students in groups pick a color and then guess who the celeb. is.. "I think it is ...." Lots of fun and then use the worksheet or have them brainstorm their own on an A4. Then one person describes and the rest in the group try to guess.

For a finale, try http://en.akinator.com and select an MC who reads the questions. Can he guess the Korean celeb? This KOREA Fling the Teacher game is cool too.

Spin The Question

This is a very easy way to get students speaking. Use the Spin the Question power point and have students in pairs/groups ask questions based on the result of the spinner. Use this with some pictures to make it even more specific. Show a picture and then spin. Students must ask a question about the picture based on that question prompt. Lots of other ways to use this! Even make your own flash based one by using the spinner…
Author:- ddeubel


This is a very easy way to get students speaking. Use the Spin the Question power point and have students in pairs/groups ask questions based on the result of the spinner.
Use this with some pictures to make it even more specific. Show a picture and then spin. Students must ask a question about the picture based on that question prompt.

Lots of other ways to use this! Even make your own flash based one by using the spinner generators in our Teacher's Toolbox.

Guess What / Guess Who games

This is similar to the picture puzzle game! Here is a nice template for playing a guessing game with photos. Use it as a pure guessing game or as a score board. Students answer questions and if right, can choose a square and try to guess the photo for more bonus points. How to change the photos: On a slide, click and grab the box on the edge of the yellow. Drag it to the side. Click and delete.…
Author:- ddeubel

This is similar to the picture puzzle game! Here is a nice template for playing a guessing game with photos. Use it as a pure guessing game or as a score board. Students answer questions and if right, can choose a square and try to guess the photo for more bonus points.

How to change the photos: On a slide, click and grab the box on the edge of the yellow. Drag it to the side. Click and delete. Then paste in or insert your own photo. Slide the box back under the yellow boxes. Continue changing the other slides. You will want to preview the game yourself to know what it looks like. Make sure you click on the Slideshow tab before you show your screen to your students. There are 10 boards in this file.

Past perfect games

Two games to practise past perfect tense can be found at http://aj3000.com/wpkurzy/?p=36
Author:- Zdenek Rotrekl

Two games to practise past perfect tense can be found at http://aj3000.com/wpkurzy/?p=36

Purpose games

Many of my students really like this site. And apparently many of my blog viewers. Have you used it in your classes? If so, how have you done it?
Author:- Paul Fundin

Many of my students really like this site. And apparently many of my blog viewers. Have you used it in your classes? If so, how have you done it?

An Embodied Approach to Language Development

I've been looking at ways of applying the principles of experiential learning, embodiment and situated language development, as part of an ongoing research project. I combine elements of alternate reality and location-based gaming, with phenomenological theory and a discussion of the weaknesses of both traditional classrooms and 3D virtual worlds for second language development. This research is part of an assignment for my MA in creative media practice and any feedback (good or bad) would be…
Author:- Paul Driver

I've been looking at ways of applying the principles of experiential learning, embodiment and situated language development, as part of an ongoing research project. I combine elements of alternate reality and location-based gaming, with phenomenological theory and a discussion of the weaknesses of both traditional classrooms and 3D virtual worlds for second language development.

This research is part of an assignment for my MA in creative media practice and any feedback (good or bad) would be greatly appreciated!

Here's the blog page I've used to host the project: http://web.me.com/paul_driver

Using Alternate Reality Games in language education

r.e. European Union funded education project ARGuing for Multilingual Motivation in Web 2.0 (ARGuing) is a European Union education project. The project has created the first use of an Alternate Reality Game for motivating secondary school students to learn languages. The project has also learnt how an ARG can be adapted to almost any area of education. The game that was created was called ' The Tower of Babel' and included a story designed to engage the target student group. The students…
Author:- Joel Josephson

r.e. European Union funded education project

ARGuing for Multilingual Motivation in Web 2.0 (ARGuing) is a European Union education project.

The project has created the first use of an Alternate Reality Game for motivating secondary school students to learn languages. The project has also learnt how an ARG can be adapted to almost any area of education.

The game that was created was called ' The Tower of Babel' and included a story designed to engage the target student group. The students had to save the planet by completing specific quests, collaboratively and internationally. The project has been a huge success with over 400 teachers and students from 17 countries playing the game ' The Tower of Babel'. In the final pilot over 9,000 quests were answered and 800 files uploaded.

The project has created a number of resources that are available online, these include:
3. A re-usable game platform (on a Moodle platform) that includes multiple languages http://ictthatworks.net:8080/moodle/ - you can view inside the platform by sending an email to me. Please place in the subject line of the email – TofB platform
4. A project website with additional information http://www.arg-education.eu . On the website are papers to download including:
a. A methodology to make and use Alternate Reality Games in education
b. A set of case studies of other ARGs and serious games with empirical evidence of results
c. A set of use case scenarios that show examples of how ARGs could be used for other subjects or cross-subjects
d. An online teacher training course to enable educators to use the ARG the project produced
e. Summaries of papers on the pedagogy, evaluation and the technology employed. (full papers are available in the conference proceedings of the 3rd European Conference on Games Based Learning http://academic-conferences.org/ecgbl/ecgbl2009/ecgbl09-proceedings.htm )

The project team are also offering consultancy services to other educators interested in using ARGs in education.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions.

Prof. Thomas Connolly
Coordinator ARGuing EU project
University of The West of Scotland
Thomas@arg-education.eu
http://www.arg-education.eu/

What is the 'Need' for Games in education?

Why do you think Games based learning is 'Needed' in schools today? This can be broad and conceptual or/and include academic level research. I do have my ideas but I am interested in how other stakeholders see this question. Thank you. Joel
Author:- Joel Josephson

Why do you think Games based learning is 'Needed' in schools today? This can be broad and conceptual or/and include academic level research.

I do have my ideas but I am interested in how other stakeholders see this question.

Thank you.

Joel

Teaching EFL to Preschoolers (ages 3 & 4)

The impetus for this discussion comes from Katunia, who asked, "How is it possible to calm them (3 & 4 yr olds) down?" The question took me down memory lane...I haven't taught EFL to preschoolers, but I have taught preschool. According to my memory, we were either singing songs, playing group games, making 'art', taking a walk outside, having free play, recess, eating or taking a nap : ). Is there much difference between teaching EFL to preschoolers and simply teaching preschool? I'm…
Author:- Ellen Pham

The impetus for this discussion comes from Katunia, who asked, "How is it possible to calm them (3 & 4 yr olds) down?"

The question took me down memory lane...I haven't taught EFL to preschoolers, but I have taught preschool. According to my memory, we were either singing songs, playing group games, making 'art', taking a walk outside, having free play, recess, eating or taking a nap : ). Is there much difference between teaching EFL to preschoolers and simply teaching preschool? I'm guessing probably not.

I stumbled on this site, Storytime Songs, as I was looking for simple ukulele songs I could use when I substitute teach (songs the kids have probably already learned somewhere along the way.) The songs are good, but what also interested me was the newsletters. Here's a sample from Summer 2009:

For teaching the commands STOP & GO, and perhaps colors:

The Freeze Game. Turn on music and dance! When the teacher/parent stops the music, everyone freeze. Use slow and fast songs and have children dance slowly to slow songs and quickly to fast songs. Once children master these skills, have children try moving to opposite cues: dance quickly to slow songs and slowly to the fast songs!

Color-Matching Freeze. Related to the Freeze Game, children dance when music plays and freeze when the music stops, however, now an extra step is added! Tape different colored pieces of construction paper to mats and place them around the room. When the music stops, hold up a specific color and children must find and stand on a mat that matches that color.

And a really fun game when you are learning animal names:

Sleeping, Sleeping, All the Children are Sleeping. Children pretend to sleep when the circle leader sings or chants, “Sleeping, sleeping, all the children are sleeping.” Once children are pretending to sleep, the circle leader says, “And when they woke up… they were [monkeys]!” Children wake up and pretend to act like monkeys. The circle leader then repeats the song and names other animals or actions. Children pretending to sleep can be called on to give suggestions.

This is fun for me to think about, I'll keep my eyes out for more.

Smart or Stoopid - Can you beat my score?

Sometimes you just have to take a break - relax. So here is a challenge! Can you beat my score? You have to think quick and don't have a long time to answer. Takes a few minutues. My result? Said, "Einstein has competition" 18/23 and I'm 25% more intelligent than average LOL! Give it a try! By the way - we have more new Learning games in both our Arcade and…
Author:- ddeubel

Sometimes you just have to take a break - relax. So here is a challenge!

Can you beat my score? You have to think quick and don't have a long time to answer. Takes a few minutues. My result? Said, "Einstein has competition" 18/23 and I'm 25% more intelligent than average LOL!

Give it a try! By the way - we have more new Learning games in both our Arcade and Games pages...

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LEARNING ARCADE 1 & 2 - Which games work?

Over the last year, I've taken an avid interest in the use of games in education - particularly learning English. I have my own strong opinions that A LOT of the cheerleading regarding many games are just off base (particularly using WofW and other killing games). A lot of the learning is incidental. However, if the game is simple enough and can be used either in the classroom or for self study/group study -- games can be a great way for students to learn a lot of English. I've put together in…
Author:- ddeubel

Over the last year, I've taken an avid interest in the use of games in education - particularly learning English. I have my own strong opinions that A LOT of the cheerleading regarding many games are just off base (particularly using WofW and other killing games). A lot of the learning is incidental. However, if the game is simple enough and can be used either in the classroom or for self study/group study -- games can be a great way for students to learn a lot of English.

I've put together in two arcades, ( Traditional Arcade & Role Play Arcade - find them under the PLAY tab), a super line up of what I think are the best games out there. They load quickly, can be used either directly or indirectly to prompt language production plus THEY ARE FUN!

Please take a look and let me know;

1. What games you think are good for language learning or teaching?
2. Why that/those games are good and how you'd use them, if teaching?
3. What other games NOT there, you'd think might help learners.


Thanks, enjoy! (I"m attaching here one of my own fav. games I've made - Price is Right (Toys R US version - get the students to bid in groups using a whiteboard to hold up the guessed price)

Top 5 Game

Hi David Maybe its obvious to some but I'm not sure how to play and I also want to create a top 5 game as well. What is the point of it. There are always 5 answers. Do the students guess according to the topic and if they happen to hit the answer right they get points. For Ex: days of the week. They are not in order. So do they guess in group format and if they get the answer right, they receive points or if they are wrong the X comes on? I would like to use it. Thank you
Author:- susie silver

Hi David
Maybe its obvious to some but I'm not sure how to play and I also want to create a top 5 game as well. What is the point of it. There are always 5 answers. Do the students guess according to the topic and if they happen to hit the answer right they get points. For Ex: days of the week. They are not in order. So do they guess in group format and if they get the answer right, they receive points or if they are wrong the X comes on? I would like to use it.
Thank you

What "game" on our Game page do you like the best?

I had a few minutes of downtime :) today so I played around with a few games.... My favorite is Draw My Thing. I'm hooked. Also great for students :)   Word Tetris too .....love it.   Do you…
Author:- ddeubel

I had a few minutes of downtime :) today so I played around with a few games....

My favorite is Draw My Thing. I'm hooked. Also great for students :)

 

Word Tetris too .....love it.

 

Do you have a favorite for yourself or your students?


Give others a recommendation!

David

Verb practice 2

by Cristina Milos Stick a verb on the forehead of each kid (they have no clue about it). Another kid tries to mime the action conveyed by the verb- if student 1 guesses by reading the body language of the second, he gets to keep the verb. Kids adore this game as they can move and giggle a lot!

Life-Size Verbs

by Cristina Milos Purpose: practice verbs Have two students (a boy and a girl) lying on two big papers. Have each group trace their bodies. Then each group would write verbs that are connected to various body parts (e.g. near the MOUTH- they could write "speak", "munch", yell" etc).

Sentence Making

by Cristina Milos Have many words (verbs, adjectives etc- all parts of speech) scattered on the carpet/floor. Clap hands and students try to find other students whose words can help make a sentence. You'll love the talking and the excitement :)

Oral language 2

by Cristina Milos Have kids practice speaking by creating a nice community: stick papers on their backs (e.g. "Tell me something nice about my shoes", Tell me something nice about my hands" etc) and have them move around. They would stop and compliment each other

Oral language

by Cristina Milos Have kids practice speaking by creating a nice community: stick papers on their backs (e.g. "Tell me something nice about my shoes", Tell me something nice about my hands" etc) and have them move around. They would stop and compliment each other

Pow-Wow Drum

by Cristina Milos Whenever the occasion arises, engage kids in after-reading activities that are fun. We had a Native American poem (The Pow-Wow Drum) so after having discussed it, we turned into Indians, performed and sang :) *in groups

Mood-o-Meter

by Cristina Milos After-reading activity Show how a character's feelings change throughout the story

Story Kite

by Cristina Milos After -reading activity Have a kite divided in 4 sections: Setting, Characters, Problem, Resolution. Decorate.

Story Map- Reading comprehension

by Cristina Milos After -reading activity Trace the places where a character went throughout the story (e.g. forest, home, school etc)

Passport- Reading comprehension

by Cristina Milos After-reading activity Make a passport for the main character (if the text lack some info, imagine it :)